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The text on this page was created with Google Docs, the free word processing program available at: Google/Drive/Docs.
The computer used was a Google Chromebook.

I Love Working with My Chromebook and Google Drive





When Multiple Photos Don't All Fit
on a Print-Out

A reader wrote to say she went to her son's Web site to download some family photos. — but, since the pictures were in two columns, only those on the left side of the page would fit on a print-out, while those on the right got cut off. This is not an uncommon problem, since Web pages are rarely laid out in a standard 8.5" x 11" format. However, there are different ways to compensate for this. The following steps can make multiple pictures fit on regular typewriter-size paper:

While viewing a Web page containing pictures, right-click each one and choose Save Picture/ImageAs. Give each picture a name (or accept its current name) and click OK. This will place each image inside your "Pictures" or "My Pictures"folder.

Using Your Word Processing Program to Manage Print-Outs

Launch your favorite word processing program and go to File>Page Setup, where I suggest setting all margins to .8" (8/10 of an inch from the edges). Next go to Insert>Text Box, and draw a rectangle of the approximate size and shape you expect a photo to be. With the cursor inside this box, go to Insert>Picture, followed by browsing to one of your downloaded images. The text box "frame" will adjust to fit comfortably around the picture's edges.

You can insure a perfect fit by clicking the frame and going to Format>Size>100%, where you can also opt to make the frame invisible by choosing Colors & Lines>Line>No Color.

The main advantage of having an image inside a Text Box is that you can place it wherever you want it on a page. Unframed images behave just like text characters and move along with your typing.

If you prefer to print one Web page picture to a sheet, you can right-click it and choose Print Picture. No need to bother with your word processor.

Cropping a Picture Can Save Money

Bear in mind, however, that printing any picture "as is" can use up a lot of expensive colored ink. If you download a picture of a new grandchild who is centered in a photo, give some thought to "cropping" the image and printing just the important part.

I prefer Irfanview which is automatically in the "selection/crop" mode when a picture is opened by the program. Draw a box around the important area and click the Scissors icon. Finally, click the Paste icon and go to File>Print or to File>Save As. You can also make a very large picture smaller by going to Image>Resize/Resample and specifying other dimensions or a percentage of the original size.

(The "Image>Resize/Resample" command varies among different bitmap-editors. In Windows Paint it's shown as "Image>Stretch & Skew.")

Word Processing Files with Pictures Can Be Very Large

Getting back to printing photos on a word processing page — this is fine for print-outs, but emailing an MSWord document filled with photos is NOT recommended. Graphics-laden word processing files tend to be very, very large and can take much longer to upload and download than pictures sent as individual JPG files. Also, a carefully cropped picture will always travel much faster than its overstuffed original.

Using "File>Print Preview" to See How a Print-Out Will Look

Getting back to Internet printing, if you do want to print a Web page directly from its site, you can go to File>Print Preview to see if and how it will fit on a standard typewriter page. If it is too wide, causing items to extend beyond the page's right edge, you can do one of two things:

You can download the entire page into your "Documents" folder by going to File>Save As. Inside "Documents" you will find another folder which contains all the graphics on your target page. You will also find an "HTM" file with a name corresponding to name of the Web page and the new folder. Double-clicking this file will open it in Internet Explorer and display the target page just as it appeared on the Web.

You can then pick and choose which text and/or images to copy and paste into you favorite word processor, where you can then reformat everything to suit yourself. For instance, you can change font styles and/or their sizes to make them more legible. You can also use Irfanview or Picasa (or the bitmap-editor of your choice) to crop and/or resize any of the downloaded images.

Getting back to File>Print Preview, this command is available in Internet Explorer and in Google Chrome but not in the AOL browser. However, AOL users are not obligated to use their built-in browser for everything — they can switch to IE or Chrome whenever they want.


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